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St. John’s Universit

$25,280.00(İxtisasa görə dəyişir)


  • St. John’s Universit
  • St. John’s Universit
  • St. John’s Universit

Universitet haqda məlumat

Təhsil haqqı : $25,280.00(İxtisasa görə dəyişir)
Qəbul etdiyi imtahan : Qəbul: TOEFL, IELTS
Tarix : 10/08/2018
Qəbul : Qəbul bitib
Ölkə/Şəhər/Ünvan : New York

St. John’s University[ is a private, Roman Catholic, research university located in New York City, United States. Founded by the Congregation of the Mission (C.M., the Vincentian Fathers) in 1870, the school was originally located in the neighborhood of Bedford–Stuyvesant in the borough of Brooklyn.In the 1950s, the school was relocated to its current site at Utopia Parkway in Hillcrest, Queens. St. John’s also has campuses in Staten Island and Manhattan in New York City and overseas in Rome, Italy. In addition, the university has a Long Island Graduate Center in Hauppauge,along with academic locations in Paris,[6] France, and Limerick, Ireland.]The university is named after Saint John the Baptist.

St. John’s is organized into five undergraduate schools and six graduate schools. In 2016, the university had 16,440 undergraduate and 4,647 graduate students.St. John’s offers more than 100 bachelor, master, and doctoral degree programs as well as professional certificates.

History

St. John’s University was founded in 1870, by the Vincentian Fathers of the Roman Catholic Church in response to an invitation by the first Bishop of Brooklyn, John Loughlin, to provide the underprivileged youth of the city with an intellectual and moral education.

St. John’s Vincentian values stem from the ideals and works of St Vincent de Paul (1581–1660), who is the patron saint of Christian charity. Following the Vincentian tradition, the university seeks to provide an education that encourages greater involvement in social justice, charity, and service.[9] The Vincentian Center for Church and Society (“Vincenter.org”) located on the university’s Queens campus serves as “a clearinghouse for and developer of Vincentian information, poverty research, social justice resources, and as an academic/cultural programming Center.”

The English translation of the Greek on the original seal of the University is ” a lamp burning and shining” or ” a lamp shining brightly” a reference to St. John the Baptist. (A later seal of the university uses a Latin phrase that may be rendered “Christian education perfects the soul”.)[citation needed]

St. John’s University was founded as the College of St. John the Baptist at 75 Lewis Avenue, in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Ground was broken for St. John’s College Hall, the university’s first building, on May 28, 1868. The building was opened for educational purposes on September 5, 1870.Beginning with the law school in 1925, St. John’s started founding other schools and became a university in 1933. In 1954, St. John’s broke ground on a new campus in Queens, on the former site of the Hillcrest Golf Club. The following year, the original school of the university, St. John’s College, moved from Bedford-Stuyvesant to the new campus. The high school, now St. John’s Prep, took over its former buildings and later moved to its present location in the Hillcrest-Jamaica sections in Queens.

Over approximately the next two decades, the other schools of the university, which were located at a separate campus at 96 Schermerhorn Street in Downtown Brooklyn, moved out to the new campus in Queens. The last of the schools to relocate to Queens moved there in 1972, bringing an end to the Downtown Brooklyn campus of the university. In 1959, the university established a Freedom Institute to provide lectures and programs that would focus, in the words of university president Rev. John A. Flynn, President, focus “attention on the dangers of communism threatening free institutions here and abroad,” with Arpad F. Kovacs of the St. John’s history department as its director.[12] (A volume of lectures given at the Freedom Institute was edited by Kovacs and published in 1961 as Let Freedom Ring.) The university also hired the noted historian Paul Kwan-Tsien Sih to establish an Institute of Asian Studies in 1959, and similarly set up a Center for African Studies under the directorship of the economic geographer Hugh C. Brooks.

The university received praise from Time Magazine in 1962 for being a Catholic university that accepted Jews with low household income. Later St. John’s was the defendant in a lawsuit by Donald Scheiber (the only Jewish Vice President at the school) for discrimination after being removed because he was Jewish.The court ruled against St. John’s University in this lawsuit. Time also ranked St. John’s as “good−small” on a list of the nation’s Catholic universities in 1962.

The St. John’s University strike of 1966-1967 was a protest by faculty at the university which began on January 4, 1966, and ended in June 1967. The strike began after 31 faculty members were dismissed in the fall of 1965 without due process, dismissals which some felt were a violation of the professors’ academic freedom. The tension of that year was noted in Time Magazine stating, “[A]cademically, [St. John’s University] has never ranked high among Catholic schools; in troubles, it outdoes them all.” The strike ended without any reinstatements, but led to the widespread unionization of public college faculty in the New York City area. In 1970 arbitrators ruled that the university had not acted improperly.

On January 27, 1971, the New York State Board of Regents approved the consolidation of the university with the former Notre Dame College (New York) a private women’s college and the Staten Island campus of St. John’s University became a reality. Classes began in the fall of 1971, combining the original Notre Dame College with the former Brooklyn campus of St. John’s, offering undergraduate degrees in liberal arts, business and education.

Circa 1989, according to Steve Fishman of New York Magazine, “St. John’s was essentially a commuter school” but that this changed after Father Donald Harrington, a Vincentian, became the president of the university that year, replacing Father Joseph Cahill. Under Harrington the school increased its infrastructure and got an international profile.

In 1990 the tuition and fees at St. John’s was less than half of that at schools like NYU and Columbia.

In 2010 federal prosecutors charged Dr. Cecilia Chang, dean of the school’s Institute of Asian Studies and a resident of Jamaica Estates, with embezzling money from the university and by coercing scholarship recipients.[22] Chang, a graduate student alumna from Taiwan,[23] and who naturalized in 1989, began directing the Asian Center and acted as a fundraiser in 1977.[20] On Monday November 5, 2012, she testified in her own trial and committed suicide at age 59 the next day.]Anne Hendershot of Crisis Magazine wrote that the information revealed that decribed Chang giving material benefits to other members of the administration was “even more damaging to the reputation of St. John’s University.”



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